Five reasons to learn Clojure and Emacs together

December 27, 2012 § 12 Comments

There’s often debate about whether newcomers should try to learn both Clojure and Emacs at the same time. My take on it is that yes they should and here’s five reasons why.

1) Liberation

Smart IDEs ares like powerful drugs. They treat the sick and the dying wonderfully well but tend to concentrate on the symptoms more than the problem, that of bloated code. They are great for refactoring around masses of static types, but you do so inside of a walled garden in that the features you want are built into the IDE itself, and therefore you have to rely mostly on the IDE developers to make things better. The modern powerhouse IDEs are complected.

Emacs at heart is a basic text editor, one that has been around for decades with extensibility at it’s core. Because of this, and the fact it’s open source, the plugins for Emacs are essentially limitless in what they can do. There are vast amounts of major and minor modes and colour themes. Org mode awaits you.

It’s this ability to tailor Emacs so much that makes it feel liberating; you can do what you want with it. And if you really don’t enjoy a spot of configuration-masochism then they are many ‘starter kits’ on the web that will quickly get you going, see the ‘Emacs Starter Kit’ for starting out with Clojure. You could postpone engaging with Paredit mode if you wish, and make use of Cua mode to bring the sanity back to copy and pasting. The feeling of liberation can always be throttled.

2) Change

Moving from a statically typed language to Clojure is not easy. With this in mind are we really making things that much easier by encouraging devs to stick things out in a familiar IDE? Without a pertinent and dramatic sense of change are we not just making things harder? Why try to disguise the fact that Clojure is a different development world away from Java. You can’t refactor or navigate around in the same way and the debugging just isn’t as good. Developing in a sophisticated IDE without 80% of the IDEs usefulness would likely be incredibly frustrating and a turnoff. You’d be dressed up for the wrong gig.

Change also begets change. Moving to Clojure is a chance to review a lot of things; the VCS used, testing tools, approach to CI, artefact management, anything could be up for grabs. Better to make a clean break from the past.

3) Support

Following on from 2 there is the issue of support. You could be ambivalent about devs on your team using Clojure with their favourite Java IDE but then you must consider what the support cost will be. They may stumble across some half hearted wiki page about getting a certain Clojure plugin working but then would it work with Lein 2 and not just Lein 1? Is it using the deprecated Swank-Clojure or NRepl? The Clojure landscape is still shifting, newbies should probably be using the best lifeboats.

4) Simple and Easy

Like with Clojure learning Emacs from scratch isn’t excessively easy but then in the long run it’s simpler. Why would we suggest newbies to stick with their current IDEs when there’s a danger that they might not move on afterwards? Clojure and Emacs are a package of simplicity, they go well together.

And we know that simplicity is not always for free. There has to be some learning-pain before you can reap the rewards. If a developer is truly unwilling to switch to a lighter weight, more extensible dev environment then they may also be equally unwilling to make the paradigm shift to functional programming.

Of course the flip side to this is that it’s possible a developer may go to lengths to make coding even more of a pleasurable experience in the smart IDE landscape. If so, then hats off to them.

5) Mass Adoption

Trying to spread Clojure whilst recommending an IDE change sounds very counterintuitive, but then is Clojure itself ripe for mass adoption across the industry? Is this the end goal? These questions are beyond the scope of this post, but suffice to say that I’m not sure it would be a good thing if all people at the large institutions I’ve worked at started coding everything in Clojure. Emacs certainly adds to the learning divide, and makes it more explicit.

Please Vim warriors take note that these arguments could just as easily pertain to Vim.

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